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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am at the point of designing and making my spring perches, for my NOS gasser ranger. here is what i am working with, metal is 10 gauge high tensile strength, boxed doubled over top and bottom, seem weld in the middle top and bottom, I am maintaining the stock frame, I want to have boxes front and rear so I am welding the back spring mount horizontal to the rest of the frame not angled like some I have seen any in put is welcome here is some pics that may help
 

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Are you referring to the frame metal when you said "metal is 10 gauge high tensile strength"? If so, then I'd say it looks like a good basis to attach your straight axle directly to it. It depends on what the plan is, and how much money and effort you plan to put into the frame rails? The three options are to strip everything off the frame rails from the old suspension, and simply fabricate mounts for the straight axle. Or, to strip it all and clean up the frame pockets, and try to make the rails the same shape from firewall to front. Or, cut the frame rails at the firewall, and build completely new frame rails from the firewall forward. My choice would be #1, to just clean off excess brackets, and use them as they are.
Of course, be sure to start by putting the truck on a smooth surface, and get it level all around, prior to beginning the install. This will help a lot in ensuring it goes together true.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yea the frame is what I was referring to as the metal base, and I will have to strip off the old hangers and stuff for the lower control arms cause they will be in the way, not a big deal I have the tools, you have seen the rear of the frame in my project post the ranger with the green frame, so You know I like to make things pretty, I would do a frame stub, but the cab and fender supports as well as the radiator support are unitized and I would need an over head block and tackle set up to lift the cab, the one bad thing about having a finished and insulated garage (nothing to hang things from)my interest is in Ideas as far as making up the perch boxes, I know that from what I have read you should not weld parallel on the frame, vertical and circular are ok, also if the frame is 10gauge is 3/16 heavy enough to fab the perch boxes from, my welding skills are best when I am not trying to join to way different Gauges, so they are up to the task, the engine being a 2.7 built turbo charged 4 cylinder, with esslinger arca head is light. truck when last over the scales with this engine in it was 2900lbs and I have some later aluminum doors and plexiglass windows to build so thats more weight loss
 

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You mention high tensile steel as your frame material and that jogged my memory a bit. When I worked in a welding shop a while back, a guy brought a late model Ford f-series truck to have a hitch welded in and the boss saw "do not weld on frame" stamped right into it. He sent the customer away and told him to buy a bolt in hitch. I don't know if it's a real issue or just a liability thing.
 

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Welding high strength steel can cause fatigue (cracks) in the metal and damage it or change the structure of the steel. Most common MIG welders are not up to the task of welding high strength steel, especially to mild steel (what I assume you are making the spring perches out of). I am definitely out of my league when it comes to high strength steel, so I would make sure you know what you are getting into.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the heads up I think I need to talk to a certified welder, before damage is done, I know reading the ford body and frame book says to pull the frame straight cold if in a collision use heat only when necessary, the front perch boxes could be made to be bolt on, the center section/cross over is more than strong enough to bolt any thing to such as a trans verse axle set up it has 1/4 plate that is folded over for the rack steering
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well did some research the f series later model trucks have heat treated frames, not the same as rangers high tensile strength, ford says avoid welding on any frame I-cars says the same, unless absolutely necessary, I think the main thing is welding wire or rod selection and not over heating the base metal, I am going to talk to a guy I know who was a welder for Boeing Aircraft most of his life
l he would know more than most places that searched on the web
 

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If you stub a frame, there's no reason to pull the body, or in your case the cab. The stubs start in the engine bay at the firewall, so bodies never get removed.
I would consider 3/16" mounts to be the minimum I'd use. I prefer 1/4", but 1/16" difference wont be an issue, if things are properly fabricated. You'll want to sleeve places where bolts go through, and not depend on the wall thickness to support pivot points, or chance collapsing walls.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
would not have to remove the cab but i would have to lift it up to build the frame under it, you have to in order to get the rubber body pucks in and out, then build new body mounts on the stub and re install the pucks, not saying it can't be done but what i have now is stronger, also later model cars and trucks the front fender attach points and radiator core support are all welded with the main body, and there for have body mounts forward of the cab, not just simple radiator support pucks, yea I was thinking about the tube supports for the thru bolts, I need to find a source for those materials also I am out buy Mt.Rainier so I have to get my ducks in a row, cause there is not a lot of resources near by. have to drive 45 miles to Tacoma each way, I am working up some drawing for the mounts and will post them, as well as making some card board templates to mock fit, I just hate surprises they bog a project down. thanks for the insight it all helps weather I can use it or not its all great knowledge to have on hand, I was also thinking that with every thing boxed and tubes for inner support, the 3/16 should do it, it would be nice if I could talk the guy I know from Boeing to weld my stuff up then that would be sweet, but he is a sour puss and doesn't need money.... maybe i can trade skills he needs his 27 bucket T wiring finished up... HHHmmmmmmmm
 

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I'm still unsure why you'd pick the cab up, or touch the cab in any way? A stubbed frame starts in front of the cab, and replaces the rails in the engine bay, not under the cab. I've never moved a body, or touched the body to stub a frame. Simply pull the fenders off, and cut the old frame rails off. Then slip the tubes inside the existing stubs, and start fabricating new tubes.
I'm not trying to talk you into stubbing the frame. It's not my concern if you do or don't. Just want to make it clear to anyone who might consider it, that the cab or body does not need to be moved.
Radiator supports, body supports, etc., aren't anything new, and having them welded to the frame also isn't new. Ford has done that clear back to 1960. My Falcon is unibody, and the entire inner radiator support, inner fenders, etc. were all welded to the frame, and frame welded to the body. Front fenders have nothing to bolt to once all that is removed. It's just something we deal with if we want to do certain things. I chopped all that stuff off, along with all the bracketry for suspension, etc., until I ended up with two frame stubs, and a crossmember. Then I welded up all the suspension, motor mounts, frame rails, etc. Once that was done, I welded all the fenders, and hood together, and fabricated new mounting to make the frontend a one piece steel tilt.
Whatever it takes, is what it takes. But I never touched the body to do any of this work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think what you can not see in the pics, Its a unicab design every thing forward of the fire wall is welded to the cab, its just like your falcon uniboby but the frame comes off inner fender supports every thing is welded to the cab, I have had the cab lifted up be for. it would have to be lifted because all the front body supports are above the top of the frame, so the body needs to lifted out of the way to weld in new brackets or the old ones, then and the 2" pucks, body pucks require the cab to be lifted to replace or install yea it can be done, and please dont get me started on a tilt front end, I really want to do that to, like i did on my old 51 Plymouth, Oh and where are there pics of that build I really want to check it out, I bet I could learn a thing or too.
 
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