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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was presented with a problem with my first bellhousing adaptor on the back of my engine block. The early blocks like I have used 11/16 bolts for the bellhousing attachments. I'm using an 1/8th inch trans adaptor plate as part of my set of adaptors. I wanted to attach that first plate with two of the early bolt holes not used on the late pattern. Using 11/16 flathead (countersunk) bolts it left the heads sticking too far out from the plate, intefering with the second plate. So I had to find a way to grind down the tops of the flat head bolts evenly. I don't have a sanding table or mill etc. Only good ol' imagination. I do have a bench grinder so I took the bolt, placed the threaded shank into a 1/2 inch deep socket so it was loosely setting in the socket. By hold the bolt head flat against the grinding wheel (the face not the side) bu toffset so it only contacted one half of the bolt head, the grnding wheel not only ground the head down but by being offset and loose in the socket, the bolt spun evenly grinding the bolt head. Plus, the loose bolt in the socket did not transfer the heat from the grinding to the hand held socket. Worked great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I took some action--less shots, heh. The first is the bolt I had to grind the top off of and the socket. I said I used the 1/2 inch socket but I actually used the 7/16ths socket.



Then I placed the bolt into the socket. You can see the little grinding "witness" mark where I might have gotten too close to the grinder, heh.



The next two pics are how I held the socket/bolt to the grinding wheel. Offset to half of the bolt head so it would spin and grind evenly. The rate of spin could be determined by how much pressure I exerted against the stone, pushing the bolt head against the socket and slowing it down.





This is the ground down bolt in place in my bell bellhousing adaptor. If I had not ground it down, it would have stuck out enough to make the second plate not set flush.



Mark
 

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Nice work Mark! Good to figure it out without paying to have them faced off. Those allen bolts are pretty hard material!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Even a blind squirrel finds his nuts once in a while, LOL. My wife even told me I just fell into that, I never planned it. Heh, she's right again damn it. Markus O'Justluckyious
 

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Awesome job Markusthinksalot.
Good tip Sir MarkusThinksalot ..... who likes to sing & dance a lot!!!!

I usually use a table belt sander to do stuff like you did.


I was a floor model so I picked it up for a good price. Then I ordered another rest table so I don't have to move the one that came with it when I switch from using the belt to the disc sander. One of the best power tools to have in the workshop.

Your tip to use a "socket" to hold the bolt will be a BIG help..... it's hard to hold the bolt and keep the it square & in place. Usually use vice grips which can mess up the threads in addition to having the bolt flying off like a bullet !!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
John, I've looked at those things time and time again. With ownership desire in my eyes. But I just can't justify the cost over something I really need for the car. So I improvise. I'm always on the lookout at swaps but that and a good sized/priced welder never seems to show up. One of these days I'll get lucky again. Markus O'Searchious
 

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I bought one of those disc/belt sanders at Sears years ago for about $120, and figured it wouldn't get a ton of use. Boy was I wrong! I use it constantly, and I'm amazed how well it's held up over the years! I have a Milwaukie portable belt sander that I used before buying it, and I'm not even sure where it's at now? Just stopped using it at all after the Craftsman came home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've been seeing them at the swaps so maybe I ought to just --DO IT--. Would be nice to have. "I'm giving into the Force Luke". MArkus
 

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I bought one of those disc/belt sanders at Sears years ago for about $120, and figured it wouldn't get a ton of use. Boy was I wrong! I use it constantly, and I'm amazed how well it's held up over the years! I have a Milwaukie portable belt sander that I used before buying it, and I'm not even sure where it's at now? Just stopped using it at all after the Craftsman came home.
Same thing here Vall. It will be getting a "work-out" when I get to fabbing stuff for the Opel. Makes doing things so much easier for "low buck guys" who cannot afford getting things made at a machine shop.
 

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Disc/Belt sander is probably my favorite tool I use it for all kinds of things,,unusual stuff too.

I just hate getting shocked fromn the static electricity,,,is it just me or do you guys get that too!! I hate that little shock that sometimes is not so little..

I have often thought of grounding myself with a wire to the wrist etc,,but just have not gotten a "round-tuit" yet

I just plan on grounding myself regularly during a belt sanding session, stoping the project briefly just to take the shock and then I go again,,,,,maybe it is just me??


Oh and I also sharpen all my drill bits on a belt sander,,,tried all those tricky tools for drill sharpening like the drill doctor etc,,, finally I just locked in the angles with a steady hand and my drill bits are now always sharp,,,, thanks to the belt sander.....it was one of the last tools I bought but now I will never be without one.

Mark ,,it will be worth the dough!!


56 VIC - Tom
 

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Tom , mine has never shocked me. But if you still have the cushion pad under your belt that may be doing it..... Mine fell off years ago and never worried about it..... ;)
But I do have a shop vac in the basement that can run a milling machine with the static I get from the flexible hose. It's real annoying :(
 

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Never have gotten shocked from mine, but 95% of the time I'm wearing gloves when using it, so that may be the reason. I got so used to wearing gloves when I worked (job rule!) that I feel uncomfortable without them working!
 

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Tom , mine has never shocked me. But if you still have the cushion pad under your belt that may be doing it..... Mine fell off years ago and never worried about it..... ;)
But I do have a shop vac in the basement that can run a milling machine with the static I get from the flexible hose. It's real annoying :(
Steve, I do not follow what you mean about the cushion pad under the belt?:confused:

I gotta look and see if it is on rubber pads where it sits on the bench, is that what you are talking about?

I totally agree on the shop vac static thing,,that one has been known to make me hurt myself, getting away from the shock!

Actually, since I was a kid I have always seemed to have an excess amount of static electricity in me, kinda strange but I often still get shocked when others do not.


So thanks to you and Vall I now know that I am still overcharged.
Vall, I get shocked right through the gloves!:mad:

56 VIC - Tom
 
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