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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was leaving a parking lot yesterday and saw a guy pull into a gas station with a 68 falcon. I decided to talk to him as you never see that year of car on the road. He was shocked that I even knew what his car is. Most people think its a Dodge Dart. His car has a straight six but pulled a 75 351w out of a another car to swap. He said he owns a 67 mustang also. His dad owns between 5-7 66-70 falcons plus parts and might have a front bumper for my car. If it has turn signals attached, I will be in business! I hope i get to see the collection some time as its fun to see stuff like that. He also said finding replacement parts is nearly impossible for our cars. I agree with that!
 

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I was leaving a parking lot yesterday and saw a guy pull into a gas station with a 68 falcon....... He also said finding replacement parts is nearly impossible for our cars. I agree with that!
I can understand that!!!! I have only seen two other Kadetts here in the past year. At the recent World of Wheels custom car show I talked to a guy who owned a Opel Kadett station wagon. It was 100% restored to original condition looking like it just was pulled off the assembly line in Germany in 1968. He told me that a lot of the parts he needed for the restoration he found in Europe.

Being my Kadett is nowhere stock I do not have to find missing or worn out stuff. Only thing I would like to find would be weather stripping. Although I will probably find "something" that I can get to work instead of having to use stock pieces.
 

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You guys got it easy! :) Weatherstripping? How about window rubbber for a post war Austin? I had to buy late 40's Chevy rubber, then spend hours on the belt sander working it down to get it to fit. The trunk and door weathertripping is stuff I found that wasn't even close, but with a razor blade and a pair of scissors it also worked. Door handles? Mine are from a early Ford, but I had to use shim stock to get the square holes down to the size of my Austin's square holes, then mill a flat on the top and drill a hole to allow the retaining screw to hold them on.
I'm still looking for some minor parts that don't stop me from driving, and I may never find them because the change came in 1947, so they're different the next year after mine!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, ill stop complaining because they make new weatherstripping for my car still!
 

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You guys got it easy! :) Weatherstripping? ................spend hours on the belt sander working it down to get it to fit. The trunk and door weathertripping is stuff I found that wasn't even close, but with a razor blade and a pair of scissors it also worked......
Part of the FUN of building a "different" hot rod.

I will probably have to do the same thing you did Val.

I have sooooooo many things that need to be done that are "inner connected" to other things.

Last few days I have been thinking "long & hard" about this.....


Have always wanted to "chop" a roof. No doubt a "few inches" would give the Opel a "one of a kind" look more so than it has now.

With the overall "flat roof design" and simple styling of the roof posts, windshield & rear window/hatch a chop of 2-3 inches is something I am very seriously considering to add to "the list".

Having a couple of hot rod buddies that are "professional welders" who owe me a "few favors" also plays into my decision making.

Needless to say this would be a project that I would not be doing any time soon. I have so many other things to accomplish first. Would be a "over the Winter project".

So making weatherstripping for the car would be something I would put on hold until I chop the roof or decide not to.

"Pipe dreams" and "decision making" are just another "fun part" of building a hot rod!!!!! "Sweet dreams are made of this......"
 

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Whoa! Chop top! Now you're really talking special parts! even the glass will all have to be specially ordered and cut. They can't usually recut all your glass. Is the side glass flat, or is all the glass in your Opel curved slightly?
 

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The glass is flat.... even the windshield. The windshield will have to be changed one day anyway for it is "Lexan".




The roof support pillars are not curved and very simple in design which makes the chop somewhat easier than most.

Even so it is a BIG job but one worth thinking about ..... it's on "the list".
 

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I'm sure it will look great chopped, but I sure like the look as it is now! Just the right proportions of body to glass ratio. Opel really got it right when they designed those Opel wagons!
 

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I'm sure it will look great chopped, but I sure like the look as it is now! Just the right proportions of body to glass ratio. Opel really got it right when they designed those Opel wagons!
Lots of time to think through ALL of the changes that "COULD" be made.

Also NOT SURE about keeping the fender flares.

I do plan to get rid of the 8" Ford rear end (Mustang) and put in a narrowed 9" Ford. Would rather have radiused wheel wells with the proper width rear end with the tires sticking out just a little bit.

 

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I agree! Having a couple inches of tire hanging out a radiused wheelwell would really look great! Are the flares just added to the wheelwell, or was there a lot of work done to flare them?
 

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I agree! Having a couple inches of tire hanging out a radiused wheelwell would really look great! Are the flares just added to the wheelwell, or was there a lot of work done to flare them?
A lot of younger people do not understand or like the look of tires "past" the fender lip look.

The "historic roots" of tires sticking past the rear fender wells of gasser styled cars goes back to the early days of gasser class racing and continued both on the drag strip & the street well into the early-mid '70's.

LONG before the advent of the "Pro Street Look" boasting enormous tires stuffed completely "inside the fenderwells, many cars, both on the drag strip & street had tires poking from the fenders & in some cases, excessively.

Today, with the growing popularity of the "period correct look" many "modern day" gasser tribute cars are built capturing that "tires sticking out" look.


Back in the early days "how to do it" Pro Street setup wasn't even thought of back then & didn't become commonplace for many, many years. Back in the early days hot rodders/drag racers just left rear axle assemblies "as is". The reason/thought being that the wider rear stance would, in at least in theory, not only would provide more "traction" but also more high speed "stability".

Many of the more popular (& much stronger) rear ends used came from much larger cars. As the look became popular at the drag strip it also caught on the "streets" and many street driven cars, both old & newer used the "look". One that the State Police did NOT like ...... know as "Modified Suspension Violation". :(

Street machines around here could get a ticket for "any" amount of tire that protruded past the lip of the fender wells.

Fortunately for hot rodders today most police departments "look past" many of the things (& more) that used to get us pulled over & ticketed for back in the "good old days"!!!!!
 

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I think some of the old "wheels hanging out look" was also dictated by budget. Many people found a rear axle that was a close fit, and didn't spend money to narrow it. In my case the Pontiac axle in mine was narrowed 20" and the tires still hang out over 3" from the body! I could have gone narrower, but didn't want to tub the body as it would have been too extensive with frame work.
 

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I agree..... $$$$ has so much to do with everything..... whether it be "back then" or "now".
 
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