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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's some pictures of my new project. Plans are at this time to put a Ford 289 with a tunnel ram & two 4's with a 5 speed. I'm going to try & make this as "BUDGET" of a project as I can by going through salvage yards for various parts.
 

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Hey '64.......That looks like a very worthy candidate for a super fine gasser. Glad to hear you are going "budget" on this one. I love it when they're finished and look like a million dollors, you know better and feel like a genious. Lookin' forward to watching your build. Good luck!
 

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Great looking basis for a Henry J gasser! Gassers can be one of the most reasonable cars to build because there's no rule book saying it has to mimick a stock rebuild, or a certain engine combo. The whole project can be done more reasonably than a typical restoration.
I started mine with the same mindset as you, and finished it with very few new parts, and the few new parts I did buy were inexpensive. I used new parts internally in the engine, plus new valve covers. Rear tires are new, as are the seats, but they were still bargain priced. My ladder bars were purchased new, as was my front axle. I wanted a used van or truck axle, but didn't feel comfortable cutting and narrowing a I beam axle to fit under my narrow body. I really like I beams and they look very old school too!
With what you're starting with you could easily have a very decent gasser for under $6k if you can find a reasonable priced engine, trans, and rearend. If you can find a old car or truck with the drivetrain you like that run down body, or wrecked, you could get a lot more than just the drivetrain. You could end up with pedals, master cylinder, crossmembers, and numerous other parts, and finish it even cheaper!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the comments & advise guys.
I've been researching front ends & might have run up on a 47 Ford pickup front axle that I might not have to cut down to fit for what I need. I need to find out what the track width is for the Henry J & what a 47 Ford pickup is.
I have a friend with an older salvage yard I can pick from!!!!
 

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Whatever you decide on, be sure it's complete! Sometimes a free/cheap axle will cost a lot of money if it needs drums, or backing plates. Springs aren't an issue, as they're pretty cheap. Drums for an old Ford axle can cost you almost $100 ea!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, I went back over there today & what he had wasn't what I thought it was so I'm back to square one. I've been thinking about building an axle myself. Have any of you'll done this?
Also how have you'll mounted the rear ends, on top of the rear springs or underneith?
 

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Building an axle is beyond my capabilities to get kingpin bosses aligned and machined, so I've used mostly truck axles, except for my present Speedway axle kit.
I've tried mounting rearends below and above rear springs, plus numerous other ways! My first gasser was a '57 Chevy with a late 50's Chevy truck axle in 1968, and I replaced the rear springs with wagon springs, and slightly longer shackles. My next gasser was a '55 Chevy with a chrome tube straight axle that I discovered under a trailer a friend was selling! I dropped the axle under the springs in the back, and welded new perches on it.
Did a '57 wagon I had with truck axle and axle underneath the springs in back also.
I tried everything I could to use leaf springs on my Austin as I like them, but it sat either too high or too low. I finally ordered Comp Eng. ladder bars and built up the crossmembers and coil over shock mounts to make it sit exactly the height I needed.
 
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