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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone. I’m new on the page and looking to find some help/advice for a build I’ve been wanting to do for awhile. I’ve got a 1940 nash ambassador (the first year of independent front suspension) and I’m looking to raise it up, in a correct gasser stance while keeping the ifs. I have no idea where to start and would love everyone’s thoughts. I have a flathead ford V8 on the stand for it currently and I’m super excited to get it done. Thank you in advance!
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My thoughts are as follows. Since you want to retain your IFS you obviously can't go the full on straight axle route. Some longer coil springs with the same spring rate would lift the front end but also would mess with your alignment issues. There is a company that offers modified spindles for tri 5 Chevy front ends. They lower the spindle location giving the lift but retain the stock alignment specs. A good chassis fabrication shop with a certified welder (meaning he knows how to correctly weld and stress relieve cast iron) might be able to modify your existing spindles or a spare set if you can find them.
 

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Without pictures of the Nash's crossmember and suspension up front it's tough for me to advise how to lift it. The longer coils Steve mentioned would be the safest, easiest way. But might be able to fabricate ball joint spacers; IF it even has ball joints. It's likely that early IFS still uses kingpins, which would negate ball joint spacers.
If by chance the front crossmember is a bolt in unit, then it could be unbolted and spacers built to lower it, which would raise the frontend. A lot of late 30's to early 50's Chevys were done this way by using I beams fabricated as spacers between the frame and crossmember. Maybe you could jack the Nash up, and shoot some pictures of the frame, suspension, and crossmember, and post them here so we can see what's on the car?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Without pictures of the Nash's crossmember and suspension up front it's tough for me to advise how to lift it. The longer coils Steve mentioned would be the safest, easiest way. But might be able to fabricate ball joint spacers; IF it even has ball joints. It's likely that early IFS still uses kingpins, which would negate ball joint spacers.
If by chance the front crossmember is a bolt in unit, then it could be unbolted and spacers built to lower it, which would raise the frontend. A lot of late 30's to early 50's Chevys were done this way by using I beams fabricated as spacers between the frame and crossmember. Maybe you could jack the Nash up, and shoot some pictures of the frame, suspension, and crossmember, and post them here so we can see what's on the car?
Heres the photos of this style front suspension you asked for! Thanks again.
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I see a straight or a drop axle in your future. lifting that IFS is going to mess with the suspension geometry In a negative way Like was already mentioned.
 
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You have a typical knee action shock IFS, with cast control arms. And since the upper control arm is integral to the knee action shock it would not be advisable to do anything with this suspension to raise it. The crossmember is also welded solid to the frame rails, so really no way to lower it without a complete rework of the frame, and that means it's going to be more intrusive to rework that crossmember than to install a solid axle.
I agree with Mario that a parallel leaf straight axle is your only option in this case. But there's no reason it needs to be a straight tube axle, as an I beam truck axle donor could just as easily be installed and keep the frontend from being stupid high. Plus it will cost a lot less to buy a donor axle from a truck or van vs. a new tube straight axle that's around $1000 complete.
If you have fabrication skills and a good welder they're not tough to do. But if that's outside your skill level, it might be best to take a different route with your Nash, or sell the Nash and look at another car to start with.
 
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