Gasser HotRod Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,423 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know if there is more to it than buying a template and screws and just drill away. Is there any does or don'ts when doing it. I bought a summit racing template with screws that they sell for pinning. The slicks were pinned once before so I plan on lining up the old holes in the bead to my new drill holes. Backing itup on the other side is going to be tricky. These rims are new so I have to do it right the first time. Any help out there would be appreciated.
Mario
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
643 Posts
Sounds scary to me! I'll be interested in hearing this one too,,I have always wondered...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,423 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Brand new rims and a drill bit just doesn't sit right with me. LOL
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,414 Posts
When I had dedicated slicks and rims for my Camaro I simply screwed the slicks to the rims with big 1/4" hex head sheetmetal screws. I never had any backing plate inside, and I really don't know how you can install one? I divied my rim lip into 6 points inside and out, and just drilled holes before mounting the tires. Then once mounted I screwed the rims to the beads with the hex screws. I used screws the same length as the bead thickness, so the rim would hold them out enough to not penetrate through the bead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
When I had dedicated slicks and rims for my Camaro I simply screwed the slicks to the rims with big 1/4" hex head sheetmetal screws. I never had any backing plate inside, and I really don't know how you can install one? I divied my rim lip into 6 points inside and out, and just drilled holes before mounting the tires. Then once mounted I screwed the rims to the beads with the hex screws. I used screws the same length as the bead thickness, so the rim would hold them out enough to not penetrate through the bead.
That's about all I'v ever done or seen done.... no template's I remember. And how do you get a backing plate inside a tire? :confused:

Mm, I don't think I would be concerned about using the previous holes.... there should be plenty of bead to just "split the difference" and drill new holes. As Vall mentioned, I just try to evenly space 5 holes around the rim, front and rear. After mounting the tires I would drill a small pilot hole in the bead, using a bit marked for depth with masking tape, and insert the screws. The best I remember, I used #12 or #14 x 1/2" sheet metal screws.
But since you have the Summit template I'd check to see if the hole pattern matched the tires and if so... no problem! And I totally understand the apprehension to drill holes in a brand new set of wheels........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,277 Posts
Been there done that...... it IS intimidating.

I made a "stop" on the drill bit (locking collar) so not to drill too deep.

A LOT less hassle when tires are NOT mounted on the wheels. Trick is to drill the hole in the rim & not drill into the tire.

A good variable speed drill is a must.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,423 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
"I never had any backing plate inside, and I really don't know how you can install one? "

I didn't mean a backing plate. what I should have written is the outside lining up with the inside exactly where the tires have been pinned already. Backing it up is a printing term I use for lining up front to back. Ok well I guess I don't have to worry about where to start like valve stem area?
balance in mind? Everything is apart so I can drill without worries.
You guys are great friends thanks for the responses
mm
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,414 Posts
As long as the holes are spaced somewhat close to evenly, it wont affect balancing. I've never dismounted and remounted tires that had been previously drilled and screwed, so not sure how you'd get the holes aligned with old holes in the beads. If I was doing it I'd probably use smaller screws that were much longer so I could line the holes up before air was put in the tubes. That way the screws could align the holes as air went in, and guide the tires into place. Once they were seated the long screws can be removed and proper screws installed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,423 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I placed the template on the tire bead and the holes are very close in line to the template holes. I placed the template on the torque thrust rim bead edge and it seems the head of the screw is going to have to be exactly centered in the rim bead area.
The bead area is not very wide and the head of the screw will hit the lip on the edge of the rim. so I have to carefully measure in so the screw head clears and bites enough of the tire bead.
I will try in a little while. Still scared to drill those rims. LOL
mm
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,414 Posts
I placed the template on the tire bead and the holes are very close in line to the template holes. I placed the template on the torque thrust rim bead edge and it seems the head of the screw is going to have to be exactly centered in the rim bead area.
The bead area is not very wide and the head of the screw will hit the lip on the edge of the rim. so I have to carefully measure in so the screw head clears and bites enough of the tire bead.
I will try in a little while. Still scared to drill those rims. LOL
mm
Have you looked at the hardware store for different screws with a smaller head? Maybe a button head allen sheet metal screw might clear the ridge on the rim better. Would also look nicer too!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,423 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I thought about different hardware but the hex head Is so small 3/8 so I didn't think I could do much better in diameter.
Thanks for the suggestion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,423 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Summit tech gave me the low down. I need a 13/64 drill bit which is larger than the cadmium screw threads so the bead gets pulled up to the rim when the screw bites the bead. Sounds like common sense but first time for me so I want it right.
mm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,423 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Very interesting now. I called Mickey Thompson. They told me the screw should bite the rim with threads and just hit the bead and whatever is left on the screw length will just penetrate the bead. Also he said do not drill the bead. This can all make you crazy but it's good to know all this. So I'm going to find a drill bit that is the size of the inside thread of the screw. It may be the summit recommended 13/64 as they stated but I haven't checked yet. I will let you know what the drill size is.
Are you all keeping track of this "how to screw your slicks to your rims" thread. Many different opinions. Great advice.
Mm
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,414 Posts
Very interesting now. I called Mickey Thompson. They told me the screw should bite the rim with threads and just hit the bead and whatever is left on the screw length will just penetrate the bead. Also he said do not drill the bead. This can all make you crazy but it's good to know all this. So I'm going to find a drill bit that is the size of the inside thread of the screw. It may be the summit recommended 13/64 as they stated but I haven't checked yet. I will let you know what the drill size is.
Are you all keeping track of this "how to screw your slicks to your rims" thread. Many different opinions. Great advice.
Mm
I've always heard (and done it) this method is best. The screw should lock down tight on the rim, not be loose in the rim and tight on the tire bead. Not the first time I've gotten bad tech info from Summit's techs. Had one tell me that it was "OK if the crankshaft gear of a timing set just slid on by hand" I called them because it was loose on the crank, and I've always had to use an installation tool to press the crank gear on. I sent it back, and they replaced the timing set, but they sure didn't think anything was wrong. :(
 

·
Adminstrator And Sheet Metal Junkie
Joined
·
3,068 Posts
It sure makes sense to have the screw tight on the rim and the point just pierce the bead, then the air pressure would keep the bead pinned against the rim while the points would have to lock the tire from moving around the rim.... At least in my simple mind ! ! :D :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,423 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yes Steve , you are correct. I agree totally.
Just had a heart break revelation. I bought these slicks on craigslist knowing I have a couple of inches of spare space height top of the rear fender but i didn't realize the front of the tire only had 1-1/4 inches to the fender. My heart sank when I took another tape measurement across. Good news is I never drilled the rims due to my asking questions before doing any damage. My slicks are 33x10's and I may need to go 31x10 instead. My nostalgia slicks measure 29 inches in diameter and I need at least 30 or 31 inches to finish the quarter mile. Well it looks like I will have to use the nostalgia slicks instead for the reunion.
thanks for all who posted here to help me.
another example of measure twice cut once.
Mario
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,414 Posts
And then there's tire growth as the wheel speed increases! That 1.25" clearance will get smaller as the tire speed increases.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top