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Adminstrator And Sheet Metal Junkie
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Well give credit were credits do. I bought this bandsaw back in 1992 from Grizzley and cut a s*** pile of tube and bar stock threw and what ever I could fit in its vise, and changed the blade easily 50 times, and have never replaced a part......
What brings this up is, the other day I needed to trim a meer 1/16th at best off a piece of 1 1/2 120 wall tube I needed for the 55 Gasser. I was going to use the lathe but being right beside the bandsaw I figured I would take a chance. Here's what happened with my 20 year old bandsaw.









I know we're I'm getting my next piece of equipment. ;) ;)
 

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Your are right Steve.

Where I used to work we had one in the machine shop that was there when I started & was STILL there when I retired (almost 38 years).
 

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That's pretty impressive Steve for any bandsaw, let alone one that's got a lot of miles on it. I'm a big fan, but I'm biased. My oldest son works at headquarters for Grizzly tools and does all their trade shows. I've toured the store at HQ, and listened to what the owners told me about their commitment to quality tools, and seen them torn apart for testing. They really are well made and still a decent price. They're all either based on well known American designs they bought, or copies of outdated patent designs.
When they bought South Bend lathes and kept their solid technology to build their small commercial and large home shop lathes I read great reviews of those products. They've got a really great collection of old lathes from the early 1900's at HQ, and always interested in the history.
 

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I can only remember a time or two that that band saw ever needed repair for more than a few hours.

There was time I can remember when it was used to to cut a "6" round solid piece stainless steel into 3/4" slices. Can't remember exactly how many pieces were cut of what they were used for but it took "days" for it to finish cutting them. Very SLOW blade speed.... lots of water. That band saw ran for practically the entire daylight shift. I cut quite a few things on it over the years.

Those were the days.... nowadays you can't even take home a piece of rubbish, old cardboard etc let alone any of the masterpieces we used to call "government work" that had been made in that machine shop over the years. Parts for hot rods, stock cars, racing lawn mowers, motorcycles, and anything imaginable. All it would take is to "ask" and for bigger, more time consuming jobs a 6 pack of beer or, etc would get the job done.
 

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Not to get off track, but I know what you're saying John! I worked at a steel foundry in the 70's as an electrician, and one of the guys in the shop built most of his race car in the blacksmith shop after our swingshift ended each night. We often stayed until 3-4:00 a.m. to get things done. Then we just stood the frame up against the wall to clear things for dayshift. It was an Austin A40 with 440 Mopar, and we even narrowed the rearend ourselves on the big machine shop lathe!
Nowadays I can't even imagine much more than a tiny job getting past management at any medium sized business.
 

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Vall.... only difference work was done on company time!!!!! Some people really took advantage of the "liberal" approach that allowed for small jobs to be done by the machinists & welders. People would use up the entire stock of steel making things for themselves and others. Now there are cameras everywhere... including the scrap bins.
 

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I think the misuse of company time and materials is what brought these practices to an end. Since our swingshift crew was mostly there for trouble calls, we sometimes had free time during the shift that we could work on projects also. Even the foreman did projects on company time, but if there was a breakdown we dropped everything to go do it. But I understand why companies stopped the practice with the use of their time and materials, not to mention if somebody hurt themselves doing a government project!
 

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Same thing here..... even without the over abuse by some (who at the time ruined it for everyone) the way times are today U.S. factories had no choice but to "tighten things up" to survive in these "tough economic times.
 
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