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Adminstrator And Sheet Metal Junkie
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well how many of you guys still gas weld ?

This is a great exercise in butt welding and gas welding mild steel ( body sheet metal ) 19 or 20 gauge. What you will learn is how much less work it is to smooth out gas weld versus mig or tig weld. You can also control your warppage a lot better. So grab e few scrap pieces and butt them up and get ready to tack weld.



Start by tacking one end. Now this is done with a fusion weld.



Then tack the other end and next the middle. You may have to hold the metal down so you have an even seam from one end to the other.





Then continue to tack an inch to an inch and a half apart. These are still all done with fusion. Now I keep a piece of 030 mig wire off a small spare spool I use just for this. I like to drop a little wire in the weld to give it the properties the metal needs, and keeps the weld strong but not hard where your only using a tiny bit and far less then when using a mig.



Now when welding, you want to move quickly across the panel with your torch, to keep the heat to a minimum.



And the back side.



Notice that other then the metal looking like a pitch roof there's very little warpage.
With a bit of hammer welding the panel will straighten right out.







Now you may have to target right over the weld with the hammer, and work lightly out to the edge of the heat affected zone.



Now it's starting to go back to flat but not being attached to anything it still has a mild wave to it. Most of this would work out if you chance around lightly with a planishing hammer.



 

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Premium Member
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Thanks Steve.

I recently replaced a panel on the rear quarter of my '55 and have a similar issue but the 'peak' goes in. It only did it on part of the panel, the rest was flat. How would you bring the welded area 'up' to meet the rest of the outer surface? It's in about an eighth of an inch. It looks like you attacked the 'hi' part with your slapper - that would be on the inside of the rear window area on mine and I can't get a hammer in there. Any ideas?

Mike
 

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Adminstrator And Sheet Metal Junkie
Joined
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3,068 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Steve.

I recently replaced a panel on the rear quarter of my '55 and have a similar issue but the 'peak' goes in. It only did it on part of the panel, the rest was flat. How would you bring the welded area 'up' to meet the rest of the outer surface? It's in about an eighth of an inch. It looks like you attacked the 'hi' part with your slapper - that would be on the inside of the rear window area on mine and I can't get a hammer in there. Any ideas?

Mike
Hi Mike, you don't have to use your hammer or slapper in the backside which is in your case your peaked side. You can just put your dolly on the peak and if you have a slapper, you can raise that area back up with applying pressure to your dolly and slap the outside of the panel.
I can weld up another panel and do it the same way as described. Later to avoid that peak going in like that, you can make a small peaked edge on both the replacement and the original ( attached ) panel, and as you weld it will bring it to an even plain. We use this technique when we make multiple panels to make up.
 

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I love gas welding, but haven't used my torches much since I bought my Miller MIG several years ago. I really do need to get it out again and just play with it, as I always enjoyed gas welding. One issue I've had gas welding is keeping the weld even. It seems I need practice, as my joint is either low or high in spots from not doing it enough.
 
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