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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering what everyone else is using for their drill presses? I have the dewalt bits but they don't seem to be cutting that well. They take a lot of time to drill an ugly hole!
 

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Adminstrator And Sheet Metal Junkie
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We have a company not far from me that makes bits and not sure what they are called, but a friend brought me a complete set 5 years ago and haven't wore them out yet. I would say get on line and purchase an American made set. They will be pricey but they cut and last. I also have had a drill doctor for about 12 years or more and that helps. There's a fellow that sells U.S. made ones at the Carlisle shows but they need a small loan to purchase.
Travers tools on line has a good selection. I will get a link for you. http://www.travers.com/prodlist.asp?r=s&q=Drill bits &search_method=keyword&tag=STH
I have a small set of dewalt they come in a small yellow plastic pack and only go up to 3/8 and seem to work well in the hand drill but haven't tried them in the mill as of yet.
 

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I have found that even the less costly drills will last longer and cut better if I use oil or cutting fluid, keeping the drill from over-heating. Certainly a quality drill bit will do a superior job but they too will dull and need to be re-sharpened. As Steve suggested, a Drill Doctor or other sharpening devise will prolong the life of your drill considerably. I use a fine stone, the side edge, on my bench grinder to sharpen my drills. I don't recall how many drills I destroyed before I got the process down pat but there's nothing more frustrating than a dull drill. :mad:

I remember years ago.........hmmm......yea, right many years ago, going to work with my Grandfather and him taking me into the machine shop to show me how the different machines worked. The drill press, for some reason, made a lasting impression on me. I can still see those long curly tags of steel peeling off the drill, the small squirt can of oil he held in his left hand while applying pressure to the handle in his right and the brief puffs of white smoke that rose from the metal surface. I credit my grandfather for instilling my mechanical interests. He was very mechanically gifted and freely and proudly shared that knowledge........... much like members here. :D :D :D
 

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I also have found that good quality drill bits are worth the money, but there are good reasoanble, and good expensive. I bought mine through Acme Tool here, and they cost me about $75 for a 64 pc. set maybe ten years ago. They've been great, and the only ones I lost were to breaking them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'll check out the suggestions. I am sure I need to use more lubrication for the bits than I have been. The bits are probably overheating. I wish I had a setup like yours Steve, but will have to wait about 10 more years until I get to stop moving around and can have a stationary shop.
 

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Ya I'd wait till your settled in....... ;)
Ditto on that... just starting to get things & a place to have them.... has taken me a lifetime to do it.

As has been mentioned on this forum before.... there are big decisions to be made between buying tools or things/parts for the hot rod.....Especially for backyard mechanics/builders (hobbyists) who do not have then need for certain tools compared to a professional builder/shop.

The longer I do this hot rod thing (as well as other stuff that require special tools) the more I realize how nice it is to have the "right tool" for the job. Sadly, more often than not "low buckers" have to make do with what they have or find others to do certain things that require special tools or skills.
 

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On the subject of equipment, years ago I thought about leasing a spot in the shop for a hobby builder. I would have enough room for at least four, in my old shop and I would have plenty of room for my self. You would be required to have your own hand type tools and welcome to bring your roll away box. This would be a monthly , with the first and last month and a security deposit that is returned when lease is up minus broken tool cost.
With all the particulars I thought it was safer and smarter to scrap the idea......... ;)
 

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With the "sue happy" world we live in you are better off without a "room mate".

Even with insurance there is always a risk of getting burned. Times sure have changed since the good old days when there was NO worry about such things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Id be afraid of thieves. It only takes a few hours to steal some expensive stuff. Also it might not even be a person renting, but one of the renters forgetting to lock everything up.

I did see a show on a car club that rents a large shop together. Every wednesday they have a car show and help people work on cars. The club stores everything in the shop and each member has a spot. The cool thing about it is you might get a friend to help or you might get to help a friend.
 
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