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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
what is the most angle a sbc could have before starving the front cylinders of oil?. as it sets, the motor is looking at 8 degrees....intake and carb wedge will put the carb right, wedges in the rearend will keep drivetrain correct...running a 7qt pan with high volume pump ( if that means anything)...thanks
 

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Now THAT'S a great question ! ! And one that I didn't consider . . . my Ford engine has a forward sump and it's the stock size. Crap ! ! ! ! !
 

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I've seen some ford's bite the dust when people were loading them. Front sump, tall truck bed and long ramps. It's been several years ago, but they would come to the strip hauling their cars on everything imaginable. One had this 2 ton farm truck, big long boards for ramps, and would have to make several tries, spinning etc. Didn't work well with the stk pan. On the chevy with a rear sump, it'd be hard to starve it.
 

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Im not understanding the question. What would slight engine angle have to due with oil starvation on a chevy small block. Are we talking engine oiling from the oil pump? Or crank windage spashing which would come from the crank oil system from the oil pump as well. Please don't think Im criticizing, Im sincerely not understanding the issue.
 

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My experience with gen 1 small blocks is that the only oil starvation that might occur would be at high rpm. Assuming your bearing clearances are good. If you use solid roller lifters on a race motor you need oil restrictors. For the street hydraulic lifters you don't need oil restrictors but oil starvation can still occur under extended high rpm. Using a high volume oil pump with a standard pressure spring in a 7 qt pan should deliver plenty of oil for the street. Engine slightly Angled should not be a factor. Using a standard pressure spring will prevent your oiling from going all up top during race conditions but still keep the crank saturated with oil. Using a windage tray will help keep the oil supply draining back down at the oil pump pickup as well. I also use a porting trick on the rear main cap so the oil pump flows better with what ever pump you use. If you want picks pm me. May be in my albums. I can even post here.
Your carbs being level would be more of a concern and from what you stated that should be level. I think your golden.
If your running a later small block someone else better chime in on this one.

Remember this just my humble opinion :)
 

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The engine angle would have to get extreme to create an oil starving issue. The engine in my Austin sits fairly uphill in front, and no issues with oil starvation, even in drag scenarios. If oil starvation was a problem, the offroad guys would be losing engines all the time from going up and down hills all the time.
 

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What No body here has ever driven up a really steep hill, or used a dry sump system....you are ok at 8 degrees alot of old v drive boats used this angle. Carb angle spacers are mainly purchased thur boat shops, and are where they originated from and are cheaper than car shops...I think mastercraft boats still use the 8 degree on there ski natiques...I would be more concerned about the look you want under the hood...as well as the mounts for the engine not being bound up or twisted if every thing is not lined up.................just my 4 cents
 

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I would assume that motor mounts would be built around the engine, and it's installation; and not installed level, and then drop the rear. If they weren't installed at the angle the engine sat, they'd end up permanent, as you could never get the bolts out once it was installed.
Unsure of what my engine angle is on the Austin, but it needed to be more than what I usually do, because of the short wheelbase, and needing to keep the engine high enough to get to the spark plugs with my narrow frame rails. I still had to notch my frame to get to two spark plugs, even with the changes I made!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thanks guys for all the input. I will be using a 5 degree wedge on the carb, and with the 3 degree on the intake , I should be level on the carb...as for motor mounts, I'm running with the face plate and isolators. As for cosmetics, well, I don't see any trophies for best of show in my future..lol
 

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I've had a range of angles (3-5) and never really worried about to much. I guess mostly because we do not live in a flat world and cars will lift at acceleration and not to mention wheel stands. :) if you factor in that here in Pa. I've gone up hill at 10 percent grades for more than 4 miles at high rpm pulling a trailer, with no issues with even loss of pressure. Look at some of the old drag cars with crazy angles. However one time I had a friend of mine come to the shop when we were building a 32 using one of his Hemi's, and he said he didn't like the angle I had the motor at. At the time, it was on the lift and when I explained the car itself was at an angle while on the lift, he calmed down a bit. What could his concern have been ? No idea, he just said he's not replacing a motor if it's not getting oil. :mad: I let it pass and went on with my day. :) And the car still cruises the streets of Bloom with no issues. :cool:



 

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I found a pic on the internet of a before and after of the main cap. I have an after pic of my own posted here but never took a pic of the before shot. So the 1 pic off the internet has stacked on top the before and on the bottom the after. my shot by itself in the second pic is what I did to the main cap. Using a pointed stone in my die grinder careful to not hit the surface where the oil pump meets. My pic shows the rear main on the block and you have a good shot of the rounded contour at the oil passage way into the crank. Smooth and rounded transition to help the flow. As you can see the oil pump bolt takes up a lot of room so the oil must scoot around to get through. Polishing the casting can only help flow and reduce cavitation. The last shot is someone reaching down in the oil pump itself and smoothing out the exit hole. Just gotta be real careful to not nick any of the gear contact area. You do all that with a stone and some of your own time. Costs hardly anything. Put a mellings standard pressure spring in a high volume pump and it will give you a chance at a couple of horses on the top end without impeding flow. Hope this helped.
 

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