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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been looking at some old gasser pics and noticed that some ran a transverse front spring, or I hope that's what it's called. Is there any difference in handling, ride, or anything else using this set up. Looks like you could get a lower stance. What would be the preferred set up? Sorry for so many questions, but I like to learn as much as I can on these cars. I have talked to several with rat rods and street rods that say their car handles great with this type of spring set up.
 

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I've seen that on everything from Anglias to Tri-Fives. Depending on the arch of the spring it can almost look stock. Look at the TLB '55, that's what it has. Just like most suspensions, shocks play a huge part.

Mike
 

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Height can be lower regardless of whether you use parallel springs, or a transverse spring setup. What dictates height is the clearance between the oil pan and the axle, not the spring setup. Parallel springs on a I beam axle often end up under the frame, which makes them sit high. But the mounting points can be located outside the frame also, and can be raised or lowered to allow the stance to be lower. Old cars and trucks with parallel spring suspensions didn't sit any higher than those with transverse springs.
A number of cars came stock with push-pull type steering boxes, so the drag link ran alongside the frame. That eliminated the interference issue of the drag link and the oil pan. If a person wants to really get their car extremely low, the drag link needs to be alongside the frame. Most gassers never get that low, or they'd simply keep the stock setup.
One thing to consider when using a transverse spring is the mounting point. It needs to be pretty beefy for a full sized car like many gassers are. Small rat rods, roadsters, or early 30's coupes are pretty light, so mounting is very basic. The crossmember is usually under the front of the pan on a coupe or sedan of post WWII, so this and the spring arc will determine how low they can go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I seen a willys build that ended up using a transverse spring in order to get the front end down some. Found a few others that used them so that just got me curious. Myself, I'd worry about weight if you had a hemi or BBC hanging out there on a transverse spring. I did see some use coil overs which kinda takes away from the whole gasser deal.
 

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The weight of the engine isn't really an issue. The engine weight can be handled by heavy enough springs. The weight of the car is more of an issue, as it will be higher than the engine, and induce body roll. Weight can have varying effects on suspension, depending on how the weight is positioned. It takes a smaller amount of weight up high to have a lot of effect on the suspension. Body weight is not only higher, but farther from the pivot point of the transverse spring mounting point. All that adds to the effect.
 
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