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Mother Nature was hard on hotrods in Florida n surrounding areas....Any gasser hot rodder guys would already be stripping and cleaning. Some will bought by folks that just want an old car. If cars are at IAAI and Copart then insurance company have settled. IAAI and Copart means they are designated as salvage total losses. This how the company makes part of the money they pay out for the loss. What an owner may do in the that situation after settling. He would have first bid to buy the salvage back as a deduction of the total loss settlement. I would work with the insurance company to keep the car and get it cleaned and repaired. Or it may also be an opportunity to get rid of the old car and move on. If I had a favorable agreed value. You must be very careful of flood cars both IAAI and Copart charge extra but they will "clean" a car before taking pictures making it hard to determine the actual level of the damage. IAAI and Copart both will sometimes make a mark on the body showing the water level prior to that cleaning. Salt water is the most serious flood damage and even trying to salvage body panels can later lead the corrosion coming from salt. While I do feel bad of all those folks who lost their homes and vehicles, there's always a silver lining. Salvage yards will now have more of those hard to find parts. I'll be looking for some headlight lenses. Salvage yards are very aware of the value of some hard to find or no longer produced items. I don't expect anything to be cheap.
 

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Mother Nature was hard on hotrods in Florida n surrounding areas....Any gasser hot rodder guys would already be stripping and cleaning. Some will bought by folks that just want an old car. If cars are at IAAI and Copart then insurance company have settled. IAAI and Copart means they are designated as salvage total losses. This how the company makes part of the money they pay out for the loss. What an owner may do in the that situation after settling. He would have first bid to buy the salvage back as a deduction of the total loss settlement. I would work with the insurance company to keep the car and get it cleaned and repaired. Or it may also be an opportunity to get rid of the old car and move on. If I had a favorable agreed value. You must be very careful of flood cars both IAAI and Copart charge extra but they will "clean" a car before taking pictures making it hard to determine the actual level of the damage. IAAI and Copart both will sometimes make a mark on the body showing the water level prior to that cleaning. Salt water is the most serious flood damage and even trying to salvage body panels can later lead the corrosion coming from salt. While I do feel bad of all those folks who lost their homes and vehicles, there's always a silver lining. Salvage yards will now have more of those hard to find parts. I'll be looking for some headlight lenses. Salvage yards are very aware of the value of some hard to find or no longer produced items. I don't expect anything to be cheap.
Since I've got two friends whose cars were totaled by estimates of repair being too high, I have a little knowledge of this scenario. Both were insured by Hagerty and the estimates and payoffs were quickly done. But the buy it back price was far too high for either guy to want to keep the cars. In both cases Hagerty quoted a price to them before it ever left their homes, and both cars ended up going to Copart, and sold for less than they could have bought them outright. But not a lot less, so they still didn't try to buy them.
 
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