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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone on here fill me in on what Detroit 6 cyl diesels came with the 6-71 mounted on the side? What years, or anything else you might know. I've found a source for parts, bearings, seals etc, to convert them. I've been trying to do some research, I'd like to try one if I could locate a core.
 

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Not sure of years, but the diesel 6-71 have no base flange so they take long bolts or studs to go alongside the housings. Unlike the newer 6-71 that has a base flange that takes short studs or bolts. I have one sitting here I bought for $50 at a swap meet years ago with thoughts of rebuilding it. Looked into rebuild cost with bearings and rotors, and decided it's cheaper to buy a rebuilt one. Guys selling them on Ebay for under $500. But I didn't like the diesel units with the long bolts, so dropped the idea completely.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/302247175809?lpid=82&chn=ps&ul_noapp=true
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't know what you mean by the studs going up through the case. I'm talking about the ones, 6-71, that set on the side of the straight 6. You may have the shorter 6V-71 from a V 6 motor. They had long angled studs.
 

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Yes, mine has the angled style stud mount that go up the sides of the blower housing. I tore it all apart to see if there was a chance it could be used as a dummy blower with carbs on top, but no internals. I'd gladly sell it, but you probably wouldn't want it, even for parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's the 6v-71. It's shorter than the 6-71. They make a adapter plate to bolt it to a 6-71 intake. I seen 1 on ebay.
 

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vht,

Your right about the difference between the inline 6 and V6 blowers. The inline blowers are the desirable ones. In Detroit Diesel talk the 6-71 stands for, 6=number of cylinders and 71=cubic inches per cylinder. The Detroit came in 53, 71, 92 and 149 series and in 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 16 cylinders. There's a hospital generator in my territory that I work on and it a 12V149. 12 cylinders, 149 cubes per cylinder=1788 cubic inch. Its a big daddy and it Honks!

The 6-71s were built from the late 40s through the early 80s. There a great engine as long as you keep clean fuel in them. The Military used tens of thousands of them over the years. Old city and Greyhound busses used them. They make a distinct sound and if you can remember a bus from the old days then you know the sound. Cores are getting harder to find but they are still out there. Look for old machinery at gravel pits, construction yards, mines etc. Also check with Euclid and Terex Machinery dealers in your area.

Here's a short list:
Euclid construction equipment (usually painted bright green like a 71 Duster)
Terex construction equipment
GMC trucks from the 70s on back
International Harvester Trucks, 70s on back (all diesel trucks back then could be had with a Detroit but GMC and IH more so)
Old city/Greyhound style busses
Old generators (except Caterpillar and Onan)
Old diesel powered military equipment. (I've seen a Detroit on an old air raid siren, what was louder the engine or the siren?)

If you dig around there still out there. Get the book by Pat Ganahl "Guide to Street Supercharging". There's a section in there where the late Gene Mooneyham shows how to prep a 6-71 for the street. Study and follow that and you'll be able to do it yourself.

I'm not an expert but have prepped a couple blowers and I'll share what I know. Hope this helps!
 

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A couple more things. The first Detroit Diesel 4 cycle engines were built in the early 80s. Pryor to that all Detroit Diesels were 2 cycle engines and that was the reason for having a blower. A 2 cycle Detroit Diesel will barely run, if at all, without the blower. Also, there were old and new style 6-71 blowers in the inline series as well as large bore and small bore blowers. All inline type 6-71 and 4-71 blowers are good candidates for street applications. Most cores you find will have scratches in the case bores but that is not an issue. As long as there's not huge gouges from hardware and rocks going through it they will still compress a lot of air.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks Mexican Bob, I figured I'd keep an eye out for one. Parts for them are cheap, except for the ends. Someone told me you can use the GMC ends if you make some kinda support for them. I thought the no intake valves were cool.
 

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6-71 Blowers were for inline 6cyl. diesels. 71 c.i. per cyl. Hence the name. All GMC blowers were named after cyl. count. There were no inline diesels made after the 6cyl. The 4cyl. diesel was built in the '20's or '30's . Maybe earlier. There was also a 3-71. Which is extremely rare. But hot rodders still made manifolds for these tiny blowers. I think Crager made them for the 3-71. I know they made them for 4-71. There is no such thing as a true 8-71 blower or larger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I was thinking a sbc and 6-71 but I'm really a bbc person. Until the 434 in the chevelle, I hadn't had a sb since I was 18. Always used BB in all my race cars. Started with a 396 and ended with a 582. Went from a 13.26 in the 1/4 to a 4.50 in the 1/8. Think I'm going to do a BBC with a Dyers 8-71 kit. You only live once.
 

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Good choice. Nice people. Live just a few miles from the shop. When I bought a blower on line, I took it there to get checked. They checked it all out, told me how to set up certain things and didn't charge me. Said I got a good deal on it.
 
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