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Yesterday on the way to the car show I was cruising down the freeway about halfway to the show and all of a sudden there was a big dip in the freeway! I hit it hard as I didn't have time to hit the brakes when I saw it. I slowed down and everything seemed OK, but a short time after I began to smell raw gas! I pulled over to check my entire fuel line from tank to carb, but all of it was secure and dry. So drove on to the show, and did the hill climb, and 100 mile run home. But always smelling the raw unburnt gas smell.
So today I was washing all the bugs off the car, and cleaning underneath, and hoped I'd see something, but still all dry. Then I had the light go off in my brain, and I said to myself, better check the vent. I built a cover over the vent and fuel sender to protect them from damage from anything I put in the trunk. So unscrewed the cover and set it aside. Sure enough the 3/8 hard line into the vent was snapped off right at the fitting! Easy fix, as I just dressed the end, slid the fitting over it, and put a new flare on the end. I added a rubber pad under the horizontal part of the line between the tank and the exit through the floor, just incase it might have vibrated at all in the 10" section. Sure glad I found it and it was an easy fix so I don't have to smell gas and wonder when it might ignite! But can't figure out how a well secured line could fracture, and snap clean off, even with multiple big bumps?
My very first thought was that the lines are probably made in China from what is probably inferior material.
 

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Drove the '39 over to help a younger friend figure out his gas leak on his Holley carb. Easy fix as it was the float adjustment nut loose on the front bowl. Then he mentioned it's running rich, and a quick search I discovered the electric choke wasn't opening. Bad connector for the 12v. signal, so a new connector fixed it.
We went for burgers and I noticed a horrible squeak in the front of my car. Did some investigation, with both of us hanging our heads out the windows as we drove back, and sounded like the right front. Got out at his house and began pushing and pulling on the right front fender and it was squeaking at a main support bracket.
When I got home I disassembled the headlight trim as the bracket bolts into the fender inside the bucket. Made a couple poly material spacers and drilled the bolt pattern into them. Sandwiched the poly between the bracket and the fender, and tightened it all down. End of the squeak, hopefully forever!
But during my climbing around under the car I also discovered the left front fender tab snapped off! Of course that's part of the fender, and no way to weld it without damaging paint. So I made up three triangular tabs and stacked them together to drill four 3/16" holes along the edge. Bolted a pair to the broken side, sandwiching the fender lip to them, and drilled through the holes and pop riveted it to the fender. Then used the third one on passenger side to reinforce the unbroken tab so it wont break later.
This old metal gets pretty brittle over 83 years, so hopefully this is the only issue, and not the beginning of issues!
Very well done. You are quite the trouble shooter. 😀 all the older cars used a fabric gasket in many bracket areas. I bought squares of rubber from the hardware store and used it to replace most of the metal on metal attachments. I’m not running the fenders now but when I did I remember seeing thick insulating fabric material. Body mount areas too. I insulated all the mounts. The radiator support also had one.
great trouble shooting on the carb.
you are da Mann.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,644 ·
Carb was pretty easy as it began to flow gas as soon as he started it. The choke was a bit more as it appeared to be plugged in, but felt too easy to pull off. I looked inside the plastic cover and saw the actual connector pushed back.

I looked at a few images online, and saw the web type insulators between brackets and body. I still have a ton of the thick 4 ft. roll of black poly here, and it's super tough. I have to cut it with tin snips, and it's as durable as anything I've ever used. It should last longer than I'm around for sure.
I still plan on putting the welting between fenders and body this winter, and hope I can do it by loosening the fenders, and not have to completely pull them.
 

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Carb was pretty easy as it began to flow gas as soon as he started it. The choke was a bit more as it appeared to be plugged in, but felt too easy to pull off. I looked inside the plastic cover and saw the actual connector pushed back.

I looked at a few images online, and saw the web type insulators between brackets and body. I still have a ton of the thick 4 ft. roll of black poly here, and it's super tough. I have to cut it with tin snips, and it's as durable as anything I've ever used. It should last longer than I'm around for sure.
I still plan on putting the welting between fenders and body this winter, and hope I can do it by loosening the fenders, and not have to completely pull them.
I don’t see why not. Just scissor cut them to make your curves. Make a v cut to allow room inside curve. It will bend and curve easily into the slot.
 
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Discussion Starter · #1,646 ·
I don’t see why not. Just scissor cut them to make your curves. Make a v cut to allow room inside curve. It will bend and curve easily into the slot.
Yeah, I figured the long gradual bends likely wont need any pie cuts to make the shape. But the front and rear turns are tighter, and will need pie cuts to make it. Also figured I'll need to measure hole spacing and cut a U notch to allow the welting to slip over the bolt and slide in deep enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,647 ·
Today is the last day of what turned out to be a wonderful late summer in Sept. and Oct.! So cleaned up the shop out back, and put my '39 away for it's winter nap. I'll spend the next day or two getting things done that I usually do once the driving season is over.
I plan to add a canister filter to the rear of the fuel system this winter, so at that time I'll also install a manual shutoff to the fuel line, and that will allow me to run the car out of gas when I park it for the winter. Then I'll treat the fuel in the tank to keep it from going bad over the winter. Couple other changes to do over the winter, but I don't want to get to them too fast, or I'll be bored the rest of the winter!
 

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do you use Stabil to treat the gas in the tank? I am very reluctant to put my car away as I love driving it so much, but this weekend in the 80's will probably be the last weekend.
 

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do you use Stabil to treat the gas in the tank? I am very reluctant to put my car away as I love driving it so much, but this weekend in the 80's will probably be the last weekend.
Yes I do use Stabil, but I buy the one that's designed to use with ethanol gas that prevents corrosion. I dump a whole bottle in the tank, and then run it until I'm sure it's gotten into the carb. On my Austin I shut the fuel pump off after that, and let it continue to run until it runs out of gas. I'm adding a mechanical shutoff to the '39, so I'll wait until then to do the treatment on the '39.
 
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