36 Chevy 5 window coupe real deal vintage gasser - Page 2
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Thread: 36 Chevy 5 window coupe real deal vintage gasser

  1. #11
    Senior Member Road Angels's Avatar
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    With a shop like that you are never to old to stop building hot rods....I will say that is a big project...but a really great piece of history
    Lash...Washington Chapter and Member...Mean Old Bastards Club

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  3. #12
    Senior Member mmhotrod's Avatar
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    Nice project. Love the 36. I have a standard 35 (looks likes a 34). Plan on a vertical support on each quarter from back window down to the floor. Those bodies were supported with wood to stop flex up and down which would crack the fatigued metal top of the quarter. Love the olds rear. If you need pics of my wood frame check my 35 Chevy Gasser Project Thread. I noticed your frame is already boxed. Great time saver. Also make sure you hang your doors and adjust before you do any floor work as the front cowl or firewall may need to kick back or forward at the bottom to line the door body lines. I’m looking forward to watching your build. Wish you the best.
    Last edited by mmhotrod; 10-22-2020 at 07:58 AM.
    Mario





    "I post the work on my hotrod, not because it's the best way, rather it was the way I had to get it done with the resources I had.................
    Of which I might be an encouragement to other hotrodders".

  4. #13
    Junior Member TNBandit's Avatar
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    Thanks Mario and everyone else. I do plan to do a bit of reinforcing with metal where there previously was wood. 36 was a change over year for GM and thankfully they didn't use nearly as much wood as they did in your 35. No wood in the roof or the front door posts on the body. But from there back it's still mostly wood. I also plan to install a simple roll bar system (not a full cage) in keeping with it's drag racing heritage. That should help stiffen the chassis. It's actually not been boxed after the fact. That's how GM did them in 36 and called it a "top hat" type frame. I do have one area on the passenger side that needs serious attention. It appears they kept breaking the traction bar bracket and so they just kept throwing more & more chunks of heavy guage steel at it. That ultimately trapped water and caused it to rust out. ALL of that needs to go away and it will be repaired properly. Advice on how to address that is appreciated. By some miracle there is enough still there that the frame is still straight. The picture is how it is now after I grabbed a big section of 1/4" steel plate that was badly welded over the rust and pulled it off with my hands...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1544.jpg  
    Last edited by TNBandit; 10-22-2020 at 01:40 PM.

  5. #14
    Administrator 1946Austin's Avatar
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    If I was making this repair to the frame I'd start by reinforcing the top of the rail first. The top is likely the most solid part of the frame, so I'd tack a piece of 1.5"-2" box tubing across the top before beginning any repairs. Then I'd cut out the bottom of the frame first, and cut it back to where I found solid steel. I'd cut equal thickness plate to replace the piece removed, and make it identical to what I cut out. Then before I welded it back in I'd plug weld plates on either end inside the existing frame. This will give the plate a place to clamp too, and the doubling plates will strengthen the repair.
    I'd also drill holes to plug weld the filler plate to the doubler plates. And then simply weld it in at the plug welds, and butt weld the joints. Once the bottom plate was in, I'd cut out the two rusted sides, and bend up some metal to duplicate the two sides. These two sides could be bent up slightly short to slip under the saved top plate, and then a weld done on the top mating corner. Like the bottom plate I'd drill holes every few inches along the bottom L shaped edge to plug weld the side to the bottom plate. Then use doubler plates at each end as done on the bottom to make the vertical side joint also stronger when it's plug and butt welded. Once it's done you can cut the box tubing off the top and grind the welds smooth everywhere. Should be an invisible repair at this point.

    I'm sure there are other methods, but that's how I'd do it. It will add a little weight, but very little. And should be stronger than an original frame when done.
    Vall

  6. #15
    Junior Member TNBandit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1946Austin View Post
    If I was making this repair to the frame I'd start by reinforcing the top of the rail first. The top is likely the most solid part of the frame, so I'd tack a piece of 1.5"-2" box tubing across the top before beginning any repairs. Then I'd cut out the bottom of the frame first, and cut it back to where I found solid steel. I'd cut equal thickness plate to replace the piece removed, and make it identical to what I cut out. Then before I welded it back in I'd plug weld plates on either end inside the existing frame. This will give the plate a place to clamp too, and the doubling plates will strengthen the repair.
    I'd also drill holes to plug weld the filler plate to the doubler plates. And then simply weld it in at the plug welds, and butt weld the joints. Once the bottom plate was in, I'd cut out the two rusted sides, and bend up some metal to duplicate the two sides. These two sides could be bent up slightly short to slip under the saved top plate, and then a weld done on the top mating corner. Like the bottom plate I'd drill holes every few inches along the bottom L shaped edge to plug weld the side to the bottom plate. Then use doubler plates at each end as done on the bottom to make the vertical side joint also stronger when it's plug and butt welded. Once it's done you can cut the box tubing off the top and grind the welds smooth everywhere. Should be an invisible repair at this point.

    I'm sure there are other methods, but that's how I'd do it. It will add a little weight, but very little. And should be stronger than an original frame when done.
    Excellent advice. Pretty much what I planned on doing so it's solid while not being "in your face" obvious. Much appreciated.

  7. #16
    Junior Member TNBandit's Avatar
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    Got the pieces made to repair the frame at a local metal fab shop. Had to put that on hold because my buddy doing the welding is out of town. So I concentrated on the rear end. When I bought the car it had welded spider gears and 5.38 ring & pinion. Since I plan on driving this car on the street that's not a good option. Found an unmolested carrier from an Ebay seller and a set of 4.10 gears on the HAMB. Being a 58 Olds 9.3 rear I had to get a few things from Fabcraft. Ordered new brake stuff, axle bearings & seals, Moroso 3" wheel studs, etc and here we are. If anyone knows of a good source for 57-64 Olds rear drums or what else might fit please let me know.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1651.jpg   IMG_1678.jpg   IMG_1683.jpg  
    General, Pharoahs Car Club, Tennessee Chapter

  8. #17
    Senior Member mmhotrod's Avatar
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    That’s great. I love that olds rear. Great buy.
    Mario





    "I post the work on my hotrod, not because it's the best way, rather it was the way I had to get it done with the resources I had.................
    Of which I might be an encouragement to other hotrodders".

  9. #18
    Administrator 1946Austin's Avatar
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    Did you try one of the C10 drums and it didn't fit?
    Vall

  10. #19
    Junior Member TNBandit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1946Austin View Post
    Did you try one of the C10 drums and it didn't fit?
    OK so here's the verdict but it's not a 100% positive result. They fit and would work fine most likely. No rubbing on anything and the center hole is a good fit. The offset from the face of the drum that seats against the axle flange to the outside of the shoes is 1/16" less on the pickup drums. So to explain it more simply when the drums wear instead of there being a lip on the outside edge of the drum the shoes hit all the way to that edge. The drum does not overhang the backing plate to keep dirt out like they do on the truck either. The Olds drums have a fairly good size "bell" that goes over the backing plate. I think I'm going to continue looking for the right ones for now. If I can't locate any I can use truck drums but I'd rather not. Clear as mud eh ?
    General, Pharoahs Car Club, Tennessee Chapter

  11. #20
    Senior Member sbauman2's Avatar
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    Steve Hidden Content MOB in sunny So Cal
    "and the beat goes on....................."

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